Oklahoma Native Plant Corridor

Native PLant Diagram
Native Plant Corridor plant list

Another garden I visited at Oklahoma State University was next to the Engineering Building.  It is composed entirely of native plants.  There is a nifty garden directory sign so you can identify every plant if you feel like it.  It was getting pretty hot, so I did a quick walk through and got back into the shade of the Student Union.

Native plants from HouseofIngrams.com
A couple of different coneflowers next to Joe Pye Weed and a sumac
Tiger Eyes Staghorn Sumac from HouseofIngrams.com
Tiger Eyes Staghorn Sumac
Tiger Eye Sumac from HouseofIngrams.com
A closer look at the Tiger Eye Sumac
Joe Pye Weed Prairie Jewel
Joe Pye Weed Prairie Jewel
Joe Pye Weed from HouseofIngrams.com
A closer look at the Joe Pye Weed
Native Plant Corridor
Native Plant Corridor
Coneflower and Mexican Hat from HouseofIngrams.com
Tiki Torch Coneflower and yellow Mexican Hat
Yarrow and Coreopsis from HouseofIngrams.com
Terra Cotta Common Yarrow and Coreospsis ‘Big Bang Redshift’ Tickseed
Redshift Coreopsis from HouseofIngrams.com
Up close view of Big Bang Redshift Coreopsis

I love the Redshift Tickseed (Coreopsis); I could make an entire bed of various coreopsis cultivars.  Our side yard is filled with Plains Coreopsis and we let it bloom for about a month every summer.

Plains Coreopsis from HouseofIngrams.com
Plains Coreopsis in our yard

Plains Coreopsis from HouseofIngrams.com

Field of Plains Coreopsis from HouseofIngrams.com
Field of Plains Coreopsis

Once it goes to seed and looks really raggedy we mow.

Since these are Oklahoma natives, they are well suited to our, shall we say, extreme weather conditions.  Once established they are fairly drought tolerant and attract our native pollinators.

It was nice to see an entire garden of Oklahoma plants to get an idea of just how many there really are.  I’m especially intrigued by the Tiger Eye Sumac and am thinking about adding one to our landscape someday.  It reminds me of a Japanese maple, but one that might actually survive in my yard.

Do you have a favorite native plant?

 

 

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