Clearwater Marine Aquarium

While in Florida we visited the Clearwater Marine Aquarium.  If you have small children, you have probably seen this place in the Dolphin Tales movies.  It was all new to us.  This is a wildlife rehabilitation center that rescues and releases marine animals.  There are a few permanent residents that couldn’t return to the wild due to their injuries.  The most famous is Winter the dolphin, who has a prosthetic tail.  When she was about two months old she was found with her tail flukes wrapped tightly in a crab trap rope and they ended up having to remove her tail.  Hanger Prosthetics and Orthotics worked with the aquarium personnel to develop a new tail for Winter to help her swim normally.

Winter the dolphin enrichment
The staff engages the dolphins with enrichment activities daily.

Nicholas is another rescued dolphin who came to CMA when he was a tiny baby with severe sunburn on his back from beaching himself next to his mother.  Dolphins must be taught survival skills by their mother and unfortunately, his mother didn’t survive.  He did recover from his injuries and is now a permanent resident at CMA.  He lives in an outdoor tank.  You might see him here on his webcam.

There are many educational presentations going on during the day.  One of these is Tail Talk with Nicholas.  If he feels like participating, he does some high leaping out of the water-the first three rows are a splash zone.

Nicholas the dolphin

Nicholas the dolphin

There are also resident otters, sea turtles, stingrays, pelicans, and sharks at CMA.

Because this is a working animal hospital it is unlike other aquariums.   You can observe medical procedures through glass windows.  When we visited there were many cold-stunned sea turtles in the surgical suite.  Since our visit, they were able to release several of those turtles, as you can see in this video:

We took a Sea Life Safari boat tour after lunch.  (We packed along some cold cuts and cheese and ate in the parking garage). You can get a combo ticket for a boat tour and CMA admission.  This tour goes through the intracoastal waters where they do a net pull to collect sea creatures (they identify them, pass them around, log them and put them back where they were found at the end of the day).  We cruised out to a tiny shell island and hung out for about 15 minutes, collected a few shells, then headed back.  It was a very fun and informative trip.

Sea Life Safari Boat
This is the boat pulled up to the tiny island.

Puffer fish Sea Life Safari
A couple of puffer fish gathered during the net pull. They had settled back to normal size at this point.
Critter from net pull, Sea Life Safari
Another critter from the net pull.
Sea Life Safari Tank
This is the tank they put critters in after they are removed from the net.

If you visit the Tampa Bay area, don’t miss this aquarium.  They are in the process of expanding the facility.  The staff and volunteers are obviously very dedicated and are focused on educating visitors.  It is also kid-friendly, but there are a lot of stairs.  The Sea Life Safari was a lot of fun and I highly recommend it as well.

CMA can always use financial support, so if you would like to donate to help support wildlife conservation, go here.

 

 

 

 

 

St. Petersburg Mural Tour

 

 

In early January we went on a family vacation in Florida.  One of the highlights of our visit was a walking tour to see just a few of the murals in downtown St. Petersburg.  A good friend of mine from high school lives in St. Pete and when she found out we would be in town she set up this great tour for us.

St Pete mural tour

The tour company is called Tour St. Pete.  They offer group and private walking tours.  There are a few different options, so check out their page and see what sounds good to you.  Their website has a slideshow with lots of fun pictures.  We enjoyed the mural tour.  Greg, our tour guide, is extremely knowledgeable about the murals and the artists who create them.  I believe he said there are something like 400 murals at this point, and they add some every year.  I definitely want to go back and do the Sunshine City Tour, which is about the history of St. Pete, and would love to take another mural tour sometime.

Our friend and her family came along with us and we had a great time catching up while we checked out the amazing art.

St. Pete mural tour

St. Pete Mural Tour Cat

No one will ever mistake me for a photographer, so try to imagine how great these murals look in person based on my not so amazing photos…

Peacock mural St. Pete tour

 

St. Pete mural tour

St. Pete mural tour

Up close you can see all the layers of color the artist used to build the final product…with spray paint, ya’ll!

St. Pete Mural Tour

The obligatory “run from your imminent destruction” shot!  Note the end of an old “Coca Cola” ad they incorporated into the mural.

St Pete Mural Tour

 

St. Pete mural tour payphones

We also found some old payphones!

St Pete Mural Tour

This one is stunning in person, look closely at the different textures going on within the shapes.

These are just a few of the murals we were able to see.  I highly recommend you visit and go on the tour if you get the chance.  As with any walking tour, dress sensibly for the weather, wear good walking shoes, put on that sunscreen and hat, pack along some water, and don’t forget your camera!

This tour was on a Sunday afternoon, and SpaceX was going to launch a rocket at 8pm CST that night…we finished the tour and set off across the state of Florida toward Cape Kennedy…but that’s another post.

Many thanks to my friend Stephanie, her family, and Greg from Tour St. Pete!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Turkey Pot Pie Soup (Low Carb and Keto Friendly)

Do you still have some post-holiday turkey lurking in your freezer?  Here’s a tasty way to use it up.  Back in the day, I would have made a fabulous turkey pot pie using a Pillsbury pie crust…but our new way of eating doesn’t call for wheat.  I do have a mighty good low carb pot pie recipe, but a turkey pot pie soup is yummy and less work, and it’s definitely soup weather here.

turkey pot pie soup low carb

This soup has no potatoes or flour to thicken it, and I don’t use cauliflower, that darling of the low carb community, because my husband kind of hates it.  I use the standard frozen veg mix with carrots, peas, green beans, and corn, but only two cups so the carbs are spread out over several servings.  If you don’t want even a tiny bit of corn, peas, or carrots, you can substitute low carb veggies of your choice.  Homemade turkey broth, butter, and heavy cream bump up the fat content to make this creamy, satisfying, and keto friendly as well.  I put in a half teaspoonful of xanthan gum to thicken–this is completely optional.  The state of your broth is very important to a good soup, so you will need to taste it and adjust the salt and other spices so it isn’t bland.  Be sure to taste BEFORE you add the salt.  A word of caution, be sure it’s cool enough to taste.  Burned tongues are no bueno.

turkey pot pie soup low carb

 

I hope you enjoy it!

Turkey Pot Pie Soup (low carb and keto friendly)

Ingredients

  • 2 Tablespoons butter
  • 1/2 cup onion chopped
  • 3 stalks celery chopped
  • 1 tsp chopped or crushed garlic
  • 6 cups turkey broth or stock
  • 4 cups shredded cooked turkey
  • 1 tsp salt to taste; may need more! check your broth for saltiness
  • 1/2 tsp freshly ground pepper
  • 1/2 tsp onion powder
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp rubbed sage or poultry seasoning
  • 1/2 tsp xanthan gum OPTIONAL
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 2 cups frozen mixed vegetables

Instructions

  1. Melt butter in large dutch oven.  Saute onion and celery until tender.  Add garlic and cook briefly (don't let it brown).  Then add broth, turkey, salt (if needed), pepper, sage, garlic and onion powder.  If using xanthan gum, sprinkle over the top and whisk thoroughly.  Add the mixed vegetables.  Simmer for about 20 minutes.  Add cream and simmer another 10 minutes or so.

Recipe Notes

One cup of this is remarkably filling, so you might even have leftovers, which are FABULOUS the next day.

 

 

Nutrition per 1 cup serving:  Calories 201, Fat 14g, Total Carbs 3g, Fiber 1g, Net Carbs 2g, Protein 13g

DIY Peanut Butter Bird “Suet”

 

 

It’s winter in Oklahoma.  We had a long very warm fall but the bottom dropped out in late December.  It is flat COLD today and it’s not going to warm up for a while.  I have filled our bird feeders with black oil sunflower seed.  The birds and a very fat squirrel are loading up on it.  When it is this cold, extra fat and protein will help birds keep warm so it’s a nice thing to offer during a cold winter.  Traditionally beef suet is the fat of choice but I don’t happen to have any of that.  I used to make bird food using peanut butter, bacon grease, and cornmeal, but the latest research from Cornell Ornithology seems to indicate that bacon grease isn’t the best thing for birds due to the sodium and nitrate content.

One has to be careful when feeding fat to birds.  If it is not frozen solid it can get on their feathers and they lose their insulating power which can cause birds to freeze.  Basically, if it’s above freezing out, pull your “suet” feed so the birds don’t get it all over them.  If you put it in an old onion or fruit bag to hang, little bird feet could get tangled in the mesh.  A wire feeder is a better option.  Fat in an easy to access place could attract more undesirable yard visitors.  If you start to notice critters you don’t want in the yard, pull that feed.

I happened to have a block of frozen beef fat left from my bone broth making and I used it to make some bacon-free bird “suet”.

Here’s how.

1 cup peanut butter (natural preferred)

1 cup beef fat OR lard, needs to be soft enough to mix

2 cups cornmeal

1 cup oatmeal

1/2 cup raisins, optional

Mix all ingredients well…I use my Kitchenaid.  I love that thing.

I pack in into old butter containers and freeze solid, then unmold and put on the platform feeder.

If the weather warms up above freezing, don’t leave it out.

 

 

 

 

 

Simple Bone Broth in Electric Roaster

Bone Broth made in an Electric Roaster

 

Bone Broth

Making bone broth isn’t a new thing, but here’s my latest version.  One of the problems I have had in the past is keeping the broth simmering but not boiling for several hours.  I have made broth in the slow cooker a few times and it works pretty well, but your volume is limited by the size of the cooker.

I picked up a shiny red electric roaster this past November after I found out I had three turkeys to cook for various events.  It worked great for the turkeys, and I got to thinking…this has precise temperature control and holds a LOT.  Why not see how some bone broth comes out?

Electric Roaster
Oster Electric Roaster

My bone broth is very simple.  I don’t add vegetables or anything but a little apple cider vinegar and some kosher salt. (Note, in the picture below there is a rack under the bones.  Mistakes were made…don’t use a rack.)

I put about 5 pounds of beef soup bones in the cooker and roasted at 400 for about an hour.  Mine went in frozen so I added a little time.  If yours aren’t frozen, adjust accordingly.  Browned is great, black not so much.

I turned down the heat to about 150.  I then added 2 gallons of cold water and 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar, and 2 teaspoons of kosher salt.  I let this sit for an hour to let the acid from the vinegar begin to pull minerals from the bones.  Then I turned it up to about 250 and covered.  I let it go for about 48 hours.  I will NOT add any more water.  If it is more than a bare simmer, I turn down the heat.  Generally, right around 200 or under is where I keep the temperature.  Check every so often to make sure things are going well.

Evaporation is not a bad thing here unless you start to boil dry.  Reducing the volume of fluid will concentrate the flavor of your final broth.  This time I went 48 hours and ended up with right around a gallon of broth.

After 24 to 48 hours, strain your broth using a fine sieve.  There will probably be a lot of fat on top.  If you place in a nonreactive container and cool in the fridge the fat will solidify on top and you can lift it off.  Discard or save to use for cooking, or make some nice cold weather bird food.  Don’t put it in freezer bags until it is completely cool; they always seem to leak when you put in warm or hot liquids.  I like to cool overnight in the fridge and then place in labeled quart freezer bags, then place on large baking sheets in the freezer to freeze flat.  They store better that way.

Gelled Bone Broth
Gelled Bone Broth

If things went well, your cooled broth will gel, just like Jello.  It is basically meat jello, because your long slow cooking process extracted the natural gelatin and collagen from the beef bones.  If it didn’t gel, don’t worry!  It’s still good bone broth and fantastic for soups or what have you.  You will need to add salt and pepper to taste (I like to add a generous amount of Lawry’s Seasoning).

Bone Broth

Simple Bone Broth

An easy way to make a lot of bone broth in an electric roaster.

Servings 16

Ingredients

  • 4 pounds grass fed beef bones
  • 2 gallons filtered cold water
  • 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tsp kosher salt

Instructions

  1. Preheat electric oven to 400 degrees.  Place bones in an electric roaster and cook for one hour or until browned.  Reduce temperature to 150 degrees.  Add water, vinegar, and salt.  Let sit for one hour.  Raise temperature to 250 degrees and cover.  Bring to boil and adjust heat to keep at a low simmer.  Cook for at least 6 and up to 48 hours.  The volume will reduce by quite a bit.  Watch to make sure it doesn't get too low.  Let cool a bit then remove bones and strain broth through a fine sieve.  Place in a non-reactive container and refrigerate until cooled.  Remove fat from the top.  Will keep in the refrigerator for up to 5 days or place in freezer bags or containers to freeze.  

  2. You will need to add salt and pepper to taste.  Lawry's seasoning is excellent.